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Books

The China Study

Apparently, T. Colin Campbell, PhD argued with his publisher about the title of this book but did not prevail. It sounds a bit dry and certainly does not indicate that the book’s content not only describes the most comprehensive study of nutrition ever conducted but the implications Campbell’s life work has for disease prevention, optimal health and weight-loss. His work is featured in the documentary film Forks Over Knives mentioned above.

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Plant-Based Nutrition

The name says it all. Julieanna Hever provides a comprehensive resource for those interested in learning about the health, nutritional and weight-loss benefits of a plant-based diet.

Eat Like You Care

I watched a video lecture of this co-author, Gary Francione, and as a result I gave up the consumption of animal products. Soon after, I was faced with many of my own and others’ questions. His book examines the morality of eating animals and  addresses “buts” such as “but where do you get your protein”, “but we’re at the top of the food chain”, and “but what if I were on a desert island starving to death?”

The Ultimate Betrayal

Is there such thing as “happy meat”? “Humane slaughter”? Hope Bohanec explores these oxymoronic labels  as well as  “grass fed”, “free range” and “cage free” to assess what they truly mean for the lives of animals.

Why We Love Dogs Eat Pigs and Where Cows

Ever wonder why we are comfortable and consider it normal to eat some animals and we are repulsed at the thought of eating others? In this book, Melanie Joy discusses “carnism” an invisible belief system, or ideology, that conditions people to eat certain animals simply because it’s the way things are.

Mind If I Order the Cheeseburger

Brilliance, humor and compassion are a powerful combination and Sherry Colb puts these three traits to use in her book that explores many questions that arise about veganism. I laughed at her description of the thoughts, for some, evoked by the word vegan, “a bleak and inexplicable asceticism akin to culinary celibacy.”

The World Peace Diet

I saw Will Tuttle speak at the Boston Vegetarian Festival. He is a  wonderful advocate for the spiritual, societal and planetary benefits of adopting a vegan diet. He is a kind and gentle soul and I had the same reaction seeing him as I did reading his book. I wanted to give him a hug, holds hands in a world peace circle and sing “Kumbaya”.

 

 

 

© 2015 Beantown Kitchen- Reprint only by permission of the author